Peak Oil News

Korting bij Tango IMG_20140110_0057 Rosso benzina Gas station Switzerland De eerste goedkope benzine Benzineprijs september 2012 in Frankrijk.

Nuclear Powered Oil Sands Production?

The much-touted potential for Canada's oil sands to offset projected declines in North American oil production remains highly questionable because of constraints on natural gas production and environmental problems, a group of Swedish industry experts concludes in a new report. To meet its ambitious targets, the industry would likely require the construction of a nuclear power plant near Fort McMurray in Alberta in order to replace natural gas in the energy-intensive production process, the scientists argue. » Source: Globe and Mail Writing in the influential European journal Energy Policy last month, the analysts for the Uppsala Hydrocarbon Depletion Study Group warned that the world should not count on Canada's massive oil sands deposits to meet future demand growth. "While the theoretical future oil supply from the oil sands is huge, the potential ability for the Canadian oil sands industry to meet expectations ...

Crude Oil Production will Peak

U.S. Energy Department study concludes crude production will peak, requiring other energy forms Last September, a Chronicle editorial warned that global oil production would peak in this decade or the next, and then inexorably decline. Given that likelihood, the United States would have to embark on a crash program to develop alternative energy sources or endure crippling increases in the price of energy. Last week, a study performed for the U.S. Department of Energy concurred with the editorial's conclusions. » Source: chron.com The study, led by Robert Hirsch, warned that the world should be spending $1 trillion per year developing alternative energy sources — including tar sands, oil shale and gas liquefaction — to avoid having its economy crippled by oil shortages and the resulting chaos. The study recommends a 20-year lead time, so it might already be too late to prevent a crunch. The report said the timing was uncertain. Hirsch ...

Economic Oil Supply Meltdown

Crude oil makes Kjell Aleklett think about wild strawberries. Aleklett, a Swedish professor of physics, sees inescapable similarities between the steady depletion of the world's most coveted energy source and the foraging habits of berry afficionados. "In Sweden we have strawberry fields where you can go out and pick for yourself. If you go out there in the morning there is a possibility that you can pick a big volume of strawberries. But the first picker picks the big ones. The last one is left with the small ones. It's very much the same thing when it comes to the production of gas and oil. » Source: The Vancouver Sun "The goodies, the big ones, have been picked. It's true all over the world. Now we have to stick to the small ones. That means it's harder to fill the ...

Fossil Fuel Future?

It would be tough to find a roughneck anywhere in the world who would describe working on a drill rig as easy, but Bob Gamble, who toils on the deck of Precision Drilling's rig number 521, comes closest. It is a state-of-the-art rig that bored its first hole just weeks before, an "iron roughneck" that has taken a lot of the backbreaking labour out of a job that has traditionally been recognized as tougher than anything outside a hardrock underground mine. » Source: canada.com If you venture to northeastern B.C., you will find dozens of similar rigs probing the landscape like mosquitoes seeking blood, guided by young workers such as Gamble who trade their labour for paycheques that can reach $100,000 a year. The machines and the workers are the physical manifestations of the biggest natural gas exploration boom in B.C.'s history, part ...

The End of Abundant Energy

As a petroleum industry analyst who gave up material security for a career as an activist against petroleum industry expansion, I've developed a unique understanding of the global peak in oil extraction. Questioning society's energy needs has always been my tendency. But I gained further understanding of our culture by giving up affluence and many conveniences. This was an attempt to get closer to nature and live by my wits with the support of activists and my growing community of friends far and wide. » Source: Gristmill In 2004 I hit the road (the rails, usually) to spread the word about the plastic plague, petrocollapse, and the positive future that culture change will present. It was fitting that the nonprofit organization I founded in 1988, Fossil Fuels Policy Action, eventually ...

Relocalization and Peak Oil

Julian Darley: The message is getting out. More and more people have noticed there's a problem with petroleum and gas. And now, peak oil is spoken - even within the corridors of power. Even though sometimes it's to deny it. But, not always, by any means. So, I think it very interesting to hear about your experiences with the kinds of people, who actually do build some of the infrastructure that we need to change. » Source: Global Public Media James Howard Kunstler: I've been associated with the New Urbanists, for about 15 years. And, they're mostly the designers and developers I consult with. And, they've done a tremendous amount of very good work around the country. Most of the best work that they do, is this stuff that they're least known for. They're best known for ...

Peak Oil Debate Continues

An engrossing, encompassing and interesting debate is raging and the entire energy fraternity is passionately involved. Proponents and the opponents of the peak oil theory are out in open — putting across their diametrically opposite arguments, in a charged atmosphere. Leading from the front, Saudi Aramco Chief Executive Abdallah S. Jum'ah is now forcefully arguing that at the current consumption levels, the world has enough oil to last — for at least 140 more years. Admitting though in a very conspicuous manner that crude remains a finite source, and none can indeed debate it, he emphasized the world has tapped only a considerably small portion, than previously thought, of this precious natural resource. » Source: MENAFM.com And when Jum'ah says something he speaks with a sense of authority and responsibility. After all he is the caretaker of the world's largest crude reserve. Speaking before a galaxy of industry experts in Vienna, ...

North Pole Ice Cracks

Satellite images of the Arctic show large openings in the perennial ice cover, yet another consequence of greenhouse warming, scientists announced this week. The Arctic's thick perennial sea ice typically survives the warmth of the summer and lasts through the year. But satellite images taken in late August show that up to 10 percent of the perennial sea ice has been fractured by summer storms. The surprising change involves an area larger than the size of the British Isles. » Source: LiveScience.com The striking openings in the pack ice were found north of Svalbard, Norway and extend to the Russian Arctic all the way to the North Pole. This condition is likely due to the thinning and extra mobility in the European section of the central Arctic ice pack seen in recent years. "This situation is unlike anything observed in previous record ...

Leadership and Social Structure

The biggest news story of modern times rarely appears in the conventional news media, or it appears only in distorted forms. Ironically, the modern world is plagued by a lack of serious information. Today's news item is usually forgotten by tomorrow. The television viewer has the vague impression that something happened somewhere, but one could change channels all day without finding anything below the surface. But television is only the start of the enigma. What is most apparent is the larger problem that there is no leadership, no sense of organization, for dealing with peak-oil issues. » Source: Counter Currents One might consider as an analogy the Great Depression. During those ten years, everyone lived on his own little island, lost, alone, and afraid. It was a "shame" to be poor, so one could not even discuss it with ...

Peak Oil Senate Report - Australia

Last fall Australia’s Senate, concerned about the future of the country’s oil supply, directed a standing committee to conduct an inquiry. The Committee was charged with investigating projections for the production and demand for oil inside Australia and globally, and the implications for the availability and price of transportation fuel. In essence, the Committee was asked to investigate peak oil. To gather information, the Committee advertised hearings and wrote to many organizations inviting submissions. In response came 192 written replies from all over the world. The Committee also held nine public hearings. Two weeks ago the preliminary findings were issued as an interim report. A final report is to be released next month. » Source: Falls Church News-Press This report to the Australian Senate is important in that an independent public body, after reviewing a wide range of evidence ...